Archive for the ‘paperwrenching’ Category

(Don’t miss the coverage of last year’s event from Unicorn Riot!)

“The whole earth is in jail and we’re plotting this incredible jailbreak.”

Online fundraiser live!

We are very happy to announce that, for the 8th year running, the Wild Roots Feral Futures (WRFF) eco-defense, direct action, and rewilding encampment will take place in the forests of Southwest Colorado this coming June 18-26, 2016 (exact location to be announced). WRFF is an informal, completely free and non-commercial, and loosely organized camp-out operating on (less than a) shoe-string budget, formed entirely off of donated, scavenged, or liberated supplies and sustained through 100% volunteer effort. Though we foster a collective communality and pool resources, we also encourage general self-sufficiency, which lightens the burden on communal supplies, and which we find to be the very source and foundation of true mutual sharing and abundance.

We would like to begin by acknowledging that Wild Roots Feral Futures takes place on occupied/stolen indigenous territory, primarily of the Nuutsiu (occasionally spelled Nuciu or Nuchu, aka “Ute”) people, as well as Diné [“Navajo”], Apache, and others. In recognition of this reality and as a first step in confronting it, we seek to establish proactive working relationships with those whose stolen land we gather upon, and open the space we temporarily gather in to the centering and amplification of indigenous voices and struggles. Our understanding is that any community of resistance that doesn’t center the voices of indigenous people and put their leadership in the forefront is a movement that is part of the problem. [Read more here…]

We would like to invite groups and individuals engaged in struggles against the destruction of the Earth (and indeed all interconnected forms of oppression) to join us and share your stories, lessons, skills, and whatever else you may have to offer. In this spirit we would like to reach out to frontline community members, local environmental groups, coalitions, and alliances everywhere, as well as more readily recognizable groups like Earth First!, Rising Tide North America, and others to come collaborate on the future of radical environmentalism and eco-defense in our bio-regions and beyond.

We would also like to reach out to groups like EF!, RTNA, and the Ruckus Society (as well as other groups and individuals) in search of trainers and workshop facilitators who are willing to dedicate themselves to attending Wild Roots Feral Futures and sharing their skills and knowledge (in a setting that lacks the financial infrastructure to compensate them as they may have come to expect from other, more well-funded groups and events). We are specifically seeking direct action, blockade, tri-pod, and tree climbing/sitting trainers (as well as gear/supplies).

Regarding the rewilding and ancestral earth skills component of WRFF, we would like to extend a similar invitation to folks with skills, knowledge, talent, or specialization in these areas to join us in the facilitation of workshops and skill shares such as fire making, shelter building, edible and medicinal plants, stalking awareness, tool & implement making, etc. We are also seeking folks with less “ancestral” outdoor survival skills such as orienteering and navigation, etc.

Daily camp life, along with workshops, skill shares, great food, friends, and music, will also include the volunteer labor necessary to camp maintenance. Please come prepared to pitch in and contribute to the workload, according to your abilities. We encourage folks who would like to plug in further to show up a few days before the official start of the event to begin set-up and stay a few days after the official end to help clean up.

Site scouting will continue until early June, at which point scouts and other organizers will rendezvous, report-back their scouting recon, and come to a consensus regarding a site location. We are also planning on choosing a secondary, back-up site location as a contingency plan for various potential scenarios. Email us for more info on getting involved with scouting and site selection processes.

WRFF is timed to take place before the Earth First! Round River Rendezvous, allowing eco-defenders to travel from one to the other. Thus we encourage the formation of a caravan from WRFF to the EF! RRR (caravans and ride shares can be coordinated through our message board at feralfutures.proboards.com.

We are currently accepting donations in the form of supplies and/or monetary contributions. Please email us for details.

Please forward this call widely, spread the word, and stay tuned for more updates!

For The Wild,

~The Wild Roots Feral Futures organizers’ collective

Email: feralfutures(at)riseup(dot)net

lynx_rendezvousimagesmall squared

For the sake of comprehensiveness, we are including below our original call-out as used in years past, which is a living document, changing and evolving as we ourselves learn and grow:

We are looking for folks of all sorts to join us and help facilitate workshops, talks, discussions, skill shares, direct action and medic trainings, wild food walks, conflict transformation, and much more! We will be focusing on many things, including but by no means limited to anarchist theory and praxis, unpacking privilege, decolonization, rewilding, ancestral skills, indigenous solidarity, direct action, forest defense, earth liberation, animal liberation, security culture, civil disobedience, hand to hand combat, survival skills, evasion tactics, green anarchism, anti-civ, post-civ, star watching and navigation, maps and orienteering, shelter building, permaculture, and whatever YOU care to bring and provide. But we need everyone’s help to make this as safe, positive, and productive a space as it can be. Our own knowledge, skills, and capacities are limited. We need YOUR help!

(more…)

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Ban Fracking on Federal Lands!

From Energy Reality:

Chaco Canyon, a UNESCO World Heritage site located in the Four Corners region of the U.S., preserves one of the most important pre-Columbian historical areas in the country. The site hosts the densest and most exceptional concentration of pueblos in the American Southwest and the area is considered sacred ancestral homelands by the Hopi and Pueblo people.

Both Chaco Canyon National Park and Otero Mesa in New Mexico, managed by the Bureau of Land Management, are being targeted for exploratory research for oil and gas extraction.

•    Click here to learn more about fracking.
•    Read Gloria Flora’s article ”Fracking the Commons.”
•    Read an essay on fighting oil and gas development in National Forests.
•    Take our partner’s call to action to ban fracking on federal lands.

Also see:

Is Nothing Sacred? Fracking and Chaco Culture National Historic Park

BLM narrows proposed Chaco drilling sites to four

 

Chaco Canyon, a UNESCO World Heritage site located in the Four Corners region of the U.S., preserves one of the most important pre-Columbian historical areas in the country. The site hosts the densest and most exceptional concentration of pueblos in the American Southwest and the area is considered sacred ancestral homelands by the Hopi and Pueblo people.

Both Chaco Canyon National Park and Otero Mesa in New Mexico, managed by the Bureau of Land Management, are being targeted for exploratory research for oil and gas extraction.

  • Click here to learn more about fracking.
  • Read Gloria Flora’s article ”Fracking the Commons.”
  • Read an essay on fighting oil and gas development in National Forests.
  • Take our partner’s call to action to ban fracking on federal lands.

– See more at: http://www.energy-reality.org/action/fracking-chaco-canyon/#sthash.sap0sexw.dpuf

Chaco Canyon, a UNESCO World Heritage site located in the Four Corners region of the U.S., preserves one of the most important pre-Columbian historical areas in the country. The site hosts the densest and most exceptional concentration of pueblos in the American Southwest and the area is considered sacred ancestral homelands by the Hopi and Pueblo people.

Both Chaco Canyon National Park and Otero Mesa in New Mexico, managed by the Bureau of Land Management, are being targeted for exploratory research for oil and gas extraction.

  • Click here to learn more about fracking.
  • Read Gloria Flora’s article ”Fracking the Commons.”
  • Read an essay on fighting oil and gas development in National Forests.
  • Take our partner’s call to action to ban fracking on federal lands.

– See more at: http://www.energy-reality.org/action/fracking-chaco-canyon/#sthash.sap0sexw.dpuf

Chaco Canyon, a UNESCO World Heritage site located in the Four Corners region of the U.S., preserves one of the most important pre-Columbian historical areas in the country. The site hosts the densest and most exceptional concentration of pueblos in the American Southwest and the area is considered sacred ancestral homelands by the Hopi and Pueblo people.

Both Chaco Canyon National Park and Otero Mesa in New Mexico, managed by the Bureau of Land Management, are being targeted for exploratory research for oil and gas extraction.

  • Click here to learn more about fracking.
  • Read Gloria Flora’s article ”Fracking the Commons.”
  • Read an essay on fighting oil and gas development in National Forests.
  • Take our partner’s call to action to ban fracking on federal lands.

– See more at: http://www.energy-reality.org/action/fracking-chaco-canyon/#sthash.sap0sexw.dpuf

Chaco Canyon, a UNESCO World Heritage site located in the Four Corners region of the U.S., preserves one of the most important pre-Columbian historical areas in the country. The site hosts the densest and most exceptional concentration of pueblos in the American Southwest and the area is considered sacred ancestral homelands by the Hopi and Pueblo people.

Both Chaco Canyon National Park and Otero Mesa in New Mexico, managed by the Bureau of Land Management, are being targeted for exploratory research for oil and gas extraction.

  • Click here to learn more about fracking.
  • Read Gloria Flora’s article ”Fracking the Commons.”
  • Read an essay on fighting oil and gas development in National Forests.
  • Take our partner’s call to action to ban fracking on federal lands.

– See more at: http://www.energy-reality.org/action/fracking-chaco-canyon/#sthash.sap0sexw.dpuf

The Green River oil refinery proposal is back

The Green River oil refinery proposal is back.

This project would place an oil refinery right on the banks of the Green River, which feeds into the Colorado. This refinery is one of many extraction industry projects currently in play, which together would turn Utah into an energy colony–from the tar sands & oil shale of Eastern Utah, to this proposed refinery and a nucluear power plant moving South, this all spells destruction for our future.

PUBLIC HEARING FOR COMMENTS TODAY IN GREEN RIVER, UTAH:
*When: April 30, 2014, 6:00 pm
*Where: John Wesley Powell River History Museum, 1765 East Main Street, Green River, Utah
*Host: Utah Division of Air Quality

SUBMIT A WRITTEN COMMENT BY MAY 2, 2014 here.

NO OIL REFINERY ON THE GREEN RIVER!

The “Canyon” uranium mine, seen here in the foreground, with Grand Canyon National Park six miles to its north. Photo by Bruce Gordon, Ecoflight.

Forest Service OKs Uranium Mining Without Tribal Consultation or Update to 27-year-old Environmental Review

From The Center for Biological Diversity:

(March 7, 2013) GRAND CANYON NATIONAL PARK— The Havasupai tribe and three conservation groups today sued the U.S. Forest Service over its decision to allow Energy Fuels Resources, Inc. to begin operating a uranium mine near Grand Canyon National Park without initiating or completing formal tribal consultations and without updating an outdated 1986 federal environmental review. The Canyon Mine threatens cultural values, wildlife and endangered species and increases the risk of soil pollution and pollution and depletion of groundwater feeding springs and wells in and near Grand Canyon. The lawsuit alleges violations of environmental, mining, public land and historic preservation laws.

“We regret that the Forest Service is not protecting our sacred site in the Red Butte Traditional Cultural Property from destruction by uranium mining,” said Don Watahomigie, chairman of the Havasupai tribe. “The Havasupai are returning to the federal courts to protect our people, our religion and our water.”

The mine is located within the boundaries of the Red Butte Traditional Cultural Property, which the Forest Service designated in 2010 for its critical religious and cultural importance to several tribes, especially Havasupai. As a “traditional cultural property,” Red Butte is eligible for inclusion on the National Register of Historic Places. The lawsuit alleges that the Forest Service violated the National Historic Preservation Act by failing to undertake any process, as required by the Act, to consult with interested tribes to determine how the adverse impacts of the mine on Red Butte could be avoided or mitigated prior to approving mining.

“The Forest Service should be protecting the Grand Canyon instead of shielding the uranium industry’s dangerous plans from public, tribal, environmental and scientific scrutiny,” said Taylor McKinnon with the Center for Biological Diversity. “Sacrificing water, culture and wildlife for the uranium industry was a bad idea in 1986, doing so now while ignoring 27 years of new information is absurd.”

The mine falls within the 1-million-acre “mineral withdrawal” approved by the Obama administration in January 2012 to protect Grand Canyon’s watershed from new uranium mining impacts. The withdrawal prohibits new mining claims and mine development on old claims lacking “valid existing rights” to mine. In April 2012, the Forest Service made a determination that there were “valid existing rights” for the Canyon mine, and in June it issued a report trying to explain its decision to allow the mine to open without updating the 27-year-old environmental review.

“After 27 years, the Forest Service is still ignoring the significant and harmful impacts of this proposed uranium mine, so near Grand Canyon and Red Butte, and in the heart of an area that provides important wildlife habitat,” said Sandy Bahr, chapter director for Sierra Club’s Grand Canyon Chapter. “The agency should be a steward of these lands and their resources, not a broker for the uranium mining industry.”

The lawsuit also alleges that the Forest Service violated the National Environmental Policy Act for failing to conduct a “supplemental environmental impact statement” to analyze changes in the planned mining and new science and circumstances that have arisen since the mine’s 1986 environmental impact statement. Those include the 2010 designation of the Red Butte Traditional Cultural Property, reintroduction of the endangered California condor, and formal and informal authorizations. Scientific studies published since 1986 demonstrate the potential for rapid aquifer recharge and connectivity between perched and deep aquifers and regional springs and creeks.

“Failure to consider new, comprehensive groundwater studies done during the 1990s for the region south of Grand Canyon is unconscionable,” said Roger Clark of the Grand Canyon Trust. “Why would the Forest Service intentionally ignore information that could prevent permanent harm to springs, which are the sole source of water for Havasupai people and lifeblood for Grand Canyon plants, animals and hikers?”

Plaintiffs in today’s suit include the Havasupai Tribe, Grand Canyon Trust, Center for Biological Diversity and Sierra Club. The suit seeks injunctive relief ceasing all mine operations and enjoining the Forest Service from authorizing or allowing any further mining related activities at the Canyon Mine site pending compliance with the law.

To view a copy of today’s complaint, click here.

Background

The Canyon Mine is located on the Kaibab National Forest six miles south of Grand Canyon National Park. The mine’s original approval in 1986 was the subject of protests and lawsuits by the Havasupai tribe and others objecting to potential uranium mining impacts on regional groundwater, springs, creeks, ecosystems and cultural values associated with Red Butte. Above-ground infrastructure was built in the early 1990s but a crash in uranium prices caused the mine’s closure in 1992 before the shaft or ore bodies could be excavated. Pre-mining exploratory drilling drained groundwater beneath the mine site, eliminating an estimated 1.3 million gallons per year from the region’s springs that are fed by groundwater. A 2010 U.S. Geological Survey report noted that past samples of groundwater beneath the mine exhibited dissolved uranium concentrations in excess of EPA drinking water standards. Groundwater threatened by the mine feeds municipal wells and seeps and springs in Grand Canyon, including Havasu Springs and Havasu Creek. Aquifer Protection Permits issued for the mine by Arizona Department of Environmental Quality do not require monitoring of deep aquifers and do not include remediation plans or bonding to correct deep aquifer contamination. Originally owned by Energy Fuels Nuclear, the mine was purchased by Denison Mines in 1997 and by Energy Fuels Resources Inc., which currently operates the mine, in 2012.

UPDATE! Gas and oil comment period gets extension!

From The Durango Herald:

The Bureau of Land Management has extended the public comment deadline for an environmental assessment of more than 12,000 acres in Southwest Colorado that are proposed for natural-gas and oil-lease sales.

The new deadline to comment is Oct. 2.

The parcels are in Archuleta, Dolores, La Plata, Montezuma and San Miguel counties and about 64 percent of the federally owned minerals are under privately owned land.

Eight parcels, or 10,761 acres, are in La Plata County near Hesperus.

The Bureau of Land Management will incorporate public comments into a final environmental assessment. The final assessment will provide the basis for the BLM’s decision whether to lease the parcels and under what stipulations.

The parcels will potentially be offered for lease in February.

“We are extending the comment period to ensure that we receive applicable information regarding resources on these parcels,” Connie Clementson, BLM Tres Rios field manager, said in a news release.

The nonprofit San Juan Citizens Alliance submitted comments criticizing the BLM’s environmental assessment because that analysis is based on a 1985 Resource Management Plan. The BLM has spent years working on a new management plan that is scheduled to be complete next year.

“We believe that any significant project such as this leasing decision, should not progress until the completion of (the BLM’s) Resource Management Plan,” the San Juan Citizens Alliance said in a statement released Tuesday. “The public provided thousands of comments in the shaping of the (management plan) and rightfully should be afforded the respect of the completion and use of the plan and as a guiding document for approval and design of all BLM-related projects.”

The San Juan Citizens Alliance and several Durango-area residents said the BLM deferred gas and oil lease sales for certain parcels in Southwest Colorado in 2008 because an updated Resource Management Plan. The BLM should continue to follow its previous reasoning, they said.

Borders confirmed that Southwest Colorado parcels were deferred in 2008, but said she did not know the reason.

Anne Marie Greenberg, resident of Durango West 2 and another opponent of BLM’s approach to the lease sale, started a Facebook page and a petition on the social change website Change.org to spread public awareness about the lease sale. The petition cites concerns about a lack of “proper public comment” and the BLM’s decision not to complete an Environmental Impact Statement. Greenberg’s petition, titled “Stop Fracking in SW Colorado,” had 272 supporters as of Wednesday.

The BLM did not complete an Environmental Impact Statement – a more thorough analysis of the potential environmental effects and risks of a certain action – for the 12,000 acres set to be leased. The BLM’s current draft environmental assessment resulted in a finding of no significant impact, which does not trigger an environmental impact statement.

Hydraulic fracturing and horizontal drilling technologies are increasingly being used to break into shale beds such as the Mancos, which the BLM environmental assessment cited as a “potential drilling target” for the Hesperus-area parcels.

To comment and view assessment:
The Bureau of Land Management’s Tres Rios Field Office is accepting public comment on the preliminary environmental assessment of 12 parcels nominated for a competitive natural-gas and oil lease sale. Comments must be submitted by Oct. 2. Comments can be mailed to the Tres Rios Field Office, Attn: Oil and Gas Lease Sale, 29211 Colorado Highway 184, Dolores, CO 81323. They also can be faxed to (970) 882-6841 or emailed to tres_rios_lease_sale@blm.gov.To view the preliminary environmental assessment, click here.

BLM proposes leasing private & public lands for gas and/or oil development

From the San Juan Citizens Alliance:

Comments needed to ensure analysis of all impacts.

The BLM is moving forward with the leasing of lands in western La Plata County and eastern Montezuma County, primarily south of Highway 160 in the area from Hesperus to Mancos Hill. The proposed lease areas also include parcels adjacent to Canyons of the Ancients National Monument, next to the McKenna Peak Wilderness Study Area in Dolores and San Miguel counties and near Chromo in Archuleta County.

We don’t know the geologic formations that are of interest to the companies that nominated the leases (they rarely publicly disclose such information), but there is a high likelihood that shale oil or shale gas are the primary targets.

The need for a thorough scientific analysis, along with a vigorous public process, is not only legally required, but is extremely warranted. Unfortunately, the Tres Rios Field Office of the BLM is doing neither.

If the leases go forward there could be significant increases in heavy truck traffic on the Hesperus/Red Mesa Highway (Route 140), Hay Gulch, and other roads in the area. There are many water quality and use issues, air quality, wildlife and other issues of concern, and project development could bring major changes to the character of the upper west side of La Plata County.

  • There are 12,175 acres in the potential lease areas, of which 7,766 acres are private surface ownership, 3,369 acres are federal surface ownership, and 1040 acres are State of Colorado surface ownership. All parcels are entirely federally owned minerals. NOTE that almost 2/3 of the proposed mineral leases would underlay PRIVATE LANDS.
  • In 2009, these same parcels were put on hold from leasing pending the completion of an updated Resource Management Plan (RMP) and Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement (SEIS). Those documents have not yet been completed, yet the BLM is now proceeding with leasing based on the clearly outdated 1985 RMP and 1991 EIS.
  • Although this is a huge issue for the communities that would be impacted by development, the BLM has made minimal efforts to get those communities’ input as well as to inform the public in general.

PLEASE CONTACT BLM IMMEDIATELY

  • BLM cannot proceed with the proposed development based upon 27-year-old analyses, especially when the updated planning documents will be completed later in 2012.
  • There is inadequate air quality, wildlife, threatened and endangered species, soil and water, cultural, transportation, socio-economic and environmental justice, and recreation and visual resource impact analysis. The reality that the BLM has proposed not leasing only 60 acres (.5 %!!!) of the industry-proposed 12,175 acres is sufficient information to note that their analyses of the nominated lease parcels in nothing less than inadequate.
  • The opportunity for public comment has been compromised by BLM’s lack of general noticing of the release of the EA, the proposed actions, and an associated “public” meeting.

The BLM is accepting written comments through September 17, 2012 regarding the Preliminary Environmental Assessment and Draft Finding of No Significant Impact. Please submit comments by mail to: Tres Rios Field Office, Attn: Lease Sale, 28211 Highway 184, Dolores, CO 81323, or by email to:  tres_rios_lease_sale@blm.gov 

Sending a copy of your comments to the local offices of your Colorado Senators can be done to:
Wanda_Cason@MarkUdall.Senate.Gov
John_Whitney@bennet.senate.gov 

The EA and associated maps are available here.

For additional information, please contact Josh Joswick at
970 259-3583 or josh@sanjuancitizens.org

San Juan Citizens Alliance is a grass roots organization dedicated to social, economic and environmental justice in the San Juan Basin. We organize San Juan Basin residents to protect our water and air, our public lands, our rural character, and our unique quality of life while embracing the diversity of our region’s people, economy and ecology.

The Bureau of Land Management’s Tres Rios Field Office is accepting public comment on the preliminary environmental assessment of 12 parcels nominated for a competitive natural-gas and oil lease sale. Comments must be submitted by Sept. 17. Comments can be mailed to the Tres Rios Field Office, Attn: Oil and Gas Lease Sale, 29211 Colorado Highway 184, Dolores, CO 81323. They also can be faxed to (970) 882-6841 or emailed to tres_rios_lease_sale@blm.gov. To view the preliminary environmental assessment, click here.

Hesperus could see thousands of acres leased for gas

Thousands of acres could be leased for gas, oil projects

By Emery Cowan, The Durango Herald

The Bureau of Land Management has released a preliminary environmental assessment of more than 12,000 acres in Southwest Colorado that are potentially set to be leased for natural-gas and oil development. Eight of the 12 parcels, encompassing 10,761 acres, are located in La Plata County near Hesperus.

The BLM is accepting public comment on the 117-page environmental assessment until Sept. 17. The agency will incorporate those comments into a final environmental assessment, which will provide the basis for the BLM’s decision whether to lease the parcels and under what stipulations.

The assessment outlines potential effects of leasing and development that include impacts on wildlife, soil, water and air quality.

The document indicates that “potential drilling targets for (Hesperus) parcels are Mancos Shale and deeper.” In recent years energy companies have been increasingly eyeing the Mancos Shale, a formation that hasn’t been developed previously but could potentially yield both oil and natural gas.

Jimbo Buickerood, public lands coordinator with the San Juan Citizens Alliance, outlined several concerns the nonprofit has with the BLM’s environmental assessment.

The most glaring is the fact that the assessment is based on a 1985 Resource Management Plan which is now outdated, Buickerood said. A resource-management plan acts as a guiding document for BLM projects and decisions.

The BLM has spent years working on a new management plan that is scheduled to be complete next year. The agency should wait until it has a more current document with up-to-date data to guide its environmental assessments, Buickerood said.

Waiting for the completion of the management plan would hold up the BLM’s work on the ground, said Shannon Borders, a spokeswoman for the BLM’s Tres Rios Field Office, which covers Southwest Colorado.

With about 70 percent of the leases located on private property, potential drilling also would affect many local landowners, Buickerood said.

All leaseholders who purchase natural-gas and oil leases must apply for drilling permits before they can develop on the land. The BLM would then be required to go through another environmental review process in line with the National Environmental Policy Act.

That process would mean it would be two to three years for development to occur after a lease sale, Borders said. The leases are scheduled to be offered in a competitive sale in February 2013.

The Center for Biological Diversity filed a lawsuit in federal court this week challenging a 25,000-acre timber sale on the Kaibab National Forest near Grand Canyon’s north rim.

Approved in January, this is the U.S. Forest Service’s fifth attempt to sell old-growth trees and forests in the Jacob Ryan project since 2003. Center appeals blocked two earlier attempts; the Forest Service voluntarily withdrew two others.

“The Forest Service consistently rejects good-faith restoration proposals and pushes logging big, old trees, contrary to its own science,” said Jay Lininger, an ecologist with the Center. “The Jacob Ryan timber sale is the opposite of forest restoration and it shows a need for reform within the agency.”

Today’s lawsuit asserts that the planned sale will remove forest habitat supporting northern goshawks and shirks rules designed to protect this rare and declining woodland raptor. According to a Forest Service report, goshawks are “vulnerable to extirpation or extinction in Arizona.” A source population of goshawks lives on the Kaibab Plateau, where Jacob Ryan is located.

In its last failed attempt to sell old-growth trees at Jacob Ryan, in 2009, the Forest Service admitted violating its rules for logging in goshawk habitat after an appeal from the Center.

Center staff also documented that old-growth trees were marked for cutting in the timber sale, despite agency statements in official planning documents that “yellow-bark” ponderosa pines older than 180 years would be left alone.

“There’s no change in the timber sale,” Lininger said. “Now the Forest Service just admits to wanting to cut down thousands of old-growth trees.”

To download a copy of today’s lawsuit, click here.

Photos of the Jacob Ryan timber sale, including old-growth trees marked for logging by the Forest Service, can be seen and downloaded here.