Archive for the ‘media’ Category

(Don’t miss the coverage of last year’s event from Unicorn Riot!)

“The whole earth is in jail and we’re plotting this incredible jailbreak.”

Online fundraiser live!

We are very happy to announce that, for the 8th year running, the Wild Roots Feral Futures (WRFF) eco-defense, direct action, and rewilding encampment will take place in the forests of Southwest Colorado this coming June 18-26, 2016 (exact location to be announced). WRFF is an informal, completely free and non-commercial, and loosely organized camp-out operating on (less than a) shoe-string budget, formed entirely off of donated, scavenged, or liberated supplies and sustained through 100% volunteer effort. Though we foster a collective communality and pool resources, we also encourage general self-sufficiency, which lightens the burden on communal supplies, and which we find to be the very source and foundation of true mutual sharing and abundance.

We would like to begin by acknowledging that Wild Roots Feral Futures takes place on occupied/stolen indigenous territory, primarily of the Nuutsiu (occasionally spelled Nuciu or Nuchu, aka “Ute”) people, as well as Diné [“Navajo”], Apache, and others. In recognition of this reality and as a first step in confronting it, we seek to establish proactive working relationships with those whose stolen land we gather upon, and open the space we temporarily gather in to the centering and amplification of indigenous voices and struggles. Our understanding is that any community of resistance that doesn’t center the voices of indigenous people and put their leadership in the forefront is a movement that is part of the problem. [Read more here…]

We would like to invite groups and individuals engaged in struggles against the destruction of the Earth (and indeed all interconnected forms of oppression) to join us and share your stories, lessons, skills, and whatever else you may have to offer. In this spirit we would like to reach out to frontline community members, local environmental groups, coalitions, and alliances everywhere, as well as more readily recognizable groups like Earth First!, Rising Tide North America, and others to come collaborate on the future of radical environmentalism and eco-defense in our bio-regions and beyond.

We would also like to reach out to groups like EF!, RTNA, and the Ruckus Society (as well as other groups and individuals) in search of trainers and workshop facilitators who are willing to dedicate themselves to attending Wild Roots Feral Futures and sharing their skills and knowledge (in a setting that lacks the financial infrastructure to compensate them as they may have come to expect from other, more well-funded groups and events). We are specifically seeking direct action, blockade, tri-pod, and tree climbing/sitting trainers (as well as gear/supplies).

Regarding the rewilding and ancestral earth skills component of WRFF, we would like to extend a similar invitation to folks with skills, knowledge, talent, or specialization in these areas to join us in the facilitation of workshops and skill shares such as fire making, shelter building, edible and medicinal plants, stalking awareness, tool & implement making, etc. We are also seeking folks with less “ancestral” outdoor survival skills such as orienteering and navigation, etc.

Daily camp life, along with workshops, skill shares, great food, friends, and music, will also include the volunteer labor necessary to camp maintenance. Please come prepared to pitch in and contribute to the workload, according to your abilities. We encourage folks who would like to plug in further to show up a few days before the official start of the event to begin set-up and stay a few days after the official end to help clean up.

Site scouting will continue until early June, at which point scouts and other organizers will rendezvous, report-back their scouting recon, and come to a consensus regarding a site location. We are also planning on choosing a secondary, back-up site location as a contingency plan for various potential scenarios. Email us for more info on getting involved with scouting and site selection processes.

WRFF is timed to take place before the Earth First! Round River Rendezvous, allowing eco-defenders to travel from one to the other. Thus we encourage the formation of a caravan from WRFF to the EF! RRR (caravans and ride shares can be coordinated through our message board at feralfutures.proboards.com.

We are currently accepting donations in the form of supplies and/or monetary contributions. Please email us for details.

Please forward this call widely, spread the word, and stay tuned for more updates!

For The Wild,

~The Wild Roots Feral Futures organizers’ collective

Email: feralfutures(at)riseup(dot)net

lynx_rendezvousimagesmall squared

For the sake of comprehensiveness, we are including below our original call-out as used in years past, which is a living document, changing and evolving as we ourselves learn and grow:

We are looking for folks of all sorts to join us and help facilitate workshops, talks, discussions, skill shares, direct action and medic trainings, wild food walks, conflict transformation, and much more! We will be focusing on many things, including but by no means limited to anarchist theory and praxis, unpacking privilege, decolonization, rewilding, ancestral skills, indigenous solidarity, direct action, forest defense, earth liberation, animal liberation, security culture, civil disobedience, hand to hand combat, survival skills, evasion tactics, green anarchism, anti-civ, post-civ, star watching and navigation, maps and orienteering, shelter building, permaculture, and whatever YOU care to bring and provide. But we need everyone’s help to make this as safe, positive, and productive a space as it can be. Our own knowledge, skills, and capacities are limited. We need YOUR help!

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From Chaparral respects no borders:

(A follow-up to last year’s piece Plunder Road: CANAMEX and the Emerging Impact of NAFTA, TPP on Western North America)

The Resolution Copper land grab is also a water grab, with a projected use of millions of gallons per year and contamination of more; and during what could be a mega-drought. Water is often compared to gold as its value increases the more scarce it becomes, which means we may soon be fighting not only the increasing privatization of land, but also of water. Despite the fact that the Resolution Copper deal, having been snuck into a defense bill, involves an exchange of land, it is being done to the advantage of a transnational mining corporation and to the detriment of the Chi’Chil’Ba’Goteel/Oak Flat/Apache Leap area and the people who hold it sacred. This land grab represents a continued prioritization of economic development in so-called Arizona, which means more resource-extraction and increased international trade (specifically with or through Mexico). Mining and other industries shaped by trade-related demand bring not only risk to water, but also more roads like Interstate 11 and rail (which require land acquisition), and increased border militarization. US trade policy is largely culpable for the violence on the border and south of the border.

Economic development is portrayed as bringing more jobs, but these “free-market” policies, as in the case of NAFTA, are meant to redistribute wealth to the hands of the rich. Because of their trade relationship and connecting infrastructure, Arizona and Sonora have a shared fate as land, water, safety, indigenous ways of life and sacred sites are all at risk. The state governments enable resource-extraction and other infrastructural projects, lucrative to those who would build them and those who would finance them, through subsidization and protection with our tax dollars.

Arizona’s connection to a port in Guaymas, Sonora is crucial to the Arizona mining industry. Copper is one of the fastest growing US exports, and much of what is and would be mined in Arizona would be transported down to where mining companies such as BHP Billiton (of Resolution Copper) and Freeport McMoran do business at this Mexican port on the Sea of Cortez. Guaymas is also significant because shipping companies can have lower standards for working conditions in Mexico versus the US. This port is the southernmost point of the CANAMEX Corridor, the NAFTA trade route connecting Canada and Mexico through five US states including Arizona. The Port of Guaymas has been expanding over the years and brings along its own set of problems in the vicinity, requiring its own energy sources and water, damaging the environment, impacting the local communities, etc. Arizona is counting on the continued growth of the Mexican economy, yet the importance of the Port of Guaymas also signifies that a lot of exports from the US are meant to cross the Pacific ocean (especially if the Trans Pacific Partnership goes into effect), not stay within its favored trade partner’s borders.

The CANAMEX Corridor already exists, but will be considered complete once Interstate 11, which is in the study phase (aside from the Boulder City Bypass which is scheduled to break ground this year) has been constructed, connecting Las Vegas and Phoenix with a route fit for freight traffic. Interstate 11 may eventually refer to the entire trade corridor reaching from Mexico to Canada, or at least is intended to span from the Mexican border and beyond Las Vegas. Parts of it maybe multi-modal including rail and other infrastructure possibly including water pipeline. This massive project will cut through communities and damage the environment. Conceptualized as the entire trade corridor, it is currently also referred to as the Intermountain West Corridor–basically CANAMEX but with a more updated, more western route where it would run north of Las Vegas. South of the border, the Mexican government has recently agreed to the request by Arizona officials to improve Route 15, which is part of this Corridor, for freight traffic.

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mesoamerica resiste

The Beehive Design Collective is coming to Fort Lewis College (Chem 130 auditorium) in Durango to present their latest giant narrative graphic poster “Mesoamérica Resiste” on April 8th at 7 PM.

SLC appearance! 7pm, May 12th @ The Mestizo Coffee House

The Beehive Design Collective is a wildly motivated, all volunteer, activist artist collective that has gained international attention for their collaboratively produced graphics campaigns focusing on globalization, resource extraction, and stories of resistance. “Mesoamérica Resiste” is their most recent project, a culmination of 9 years of story gathering in Mesoamérica, research, and illustration. The intricate, double-sided image documents resistance to the top-down development plans and mega-infrastructure projects that literally pave the way for resource extraction and free trade. It highlights stories of cross-border grassroots social movements and collective action, especially organizing led by Indigenous peoples.

For more detailed information and images on this project we recommend checking out their website and youtube video.

Since the 60′s there have been an array of spaces created to provide resources to communities — from soup kitchens to free schools to community gardens — sharing food and alternative education platforms have long been apart of our formula for social change, social justice and mutual aid. Today, there are hundreds of autonomous Food Not Bombs chapters world wide and countless social centers, infoshops and free schools maintained by volunteers. While many of these projects are made possibly solely through donations and volunteers, it is important for us to seek larger funding tools to help sustain our goals. Check out the following press release to learn how you can support one of the most effective and productive activist centers in the country!

“Right now there exists no other community action resource center in Arizona, so it’s imperative that a space like Táala Hooghan becomes more sustainable so information about grassroots efforts overlooked by the media continue to circulate within Arizona.” stated Hailey Sherwood, a volunteer with Táala Hooghan.

Organizations Join Forces to Purchase Center for Community Arts & Activism Contributions Needed for ‘Crowdfunding’ Campaign

FLAGSTAFF, AZ — Outta Your Backpack Media (OYBM) & Táala Hooghan Infoshop have joined forces with a new non-profit group called Siléí Community Empowerment Project (SCEP) to purchase a 4,500 sq ft community center for social & environmental activism.

For 5 years OYBM and Táala Hooghan have worked together to provide access to arts, activist resources, Indigenous youth empowerment, an all ages venue for musicians, and much more. “We’ve thought deeply, had hours and hours of meetings, consulted with other organizations and elders, and decided that not only is this possible, but this will enable us to have assured longevity of our vision and enable us to be more effective in our work.” said Klee Benally, a volunteer with SCEP. “We are deeply committed to ensuring that this community resource lives for generations to come.”

“We’ve already received a great amount of support and encouragement from our friends and neighbors,” said Ned Del Cajello a volunteer with OYBM & Táala Hooghan. “We are confident that through donations, community fundraisers, lending forward or ‘borrowing’ opportunities, matching funds, and other creative fundraising activities, we will secure the purchase of the building.”

Currently the groups have initiated a crowdfunding campaign through Rockethub.com. They have until October 3, 2012 to raise $10,000.00 for costs including an initial down payment.

By donating through the crowdfunding site contributors can get rewards such as a benefit compilation CD, signed books, heirloom seed packets, a limited edition t-shirt, even personal filmmaking workshops and more.

The campaign was 12% funded as of September 14, 2012.

SCEP will retain and manage the facility to ensure that the goals and vision of the center will be sustained for years to come. This will include a plan to maintain the building and property only for social and environmental justice community purposes beyond any perceived lifetime of current projects such as OYBM or Táala Hooghan.

OYBM will become a media justice and arts institute for Indigenous Youth that will facilitate year-round training in media justice and audio/visual production to support cultural and ecological justice in and around the southwest.

Táala Hooghan Infoshop will carry out its action statement for the “empowerment for youth and the greater community into action in favor of a more just and sustainable world” by having a more reliable, safe space that people know to go to for information and resources.

BACKGROUND

Since 2004, Outta Your Backpack Media (OYBM) has been growing and blossoming dynamically year by year. We have empowered hundreds of Indigenous youth to share their stories through our unique, free movie making workshops. In 2011, OYBM was one of a handful of youth organizations that were responsible for Flagstaff being recognized with the “100 Best Communities for Young People Award.”

In 2007 we partnered with Indigenous Action Media and Táala Hooghan infoshop to create our very own Youth Media Arts Center. Every part of both organizations’ effort has been 100% volunteer and supported by creative community based fundraisers.

More information about SCEP: www.oybm.org/silei
Outta Your Backpack Media: www.oybm.org
Táala Hooghan infoshop: www.taalahooghan.org

Rockethub.com campaign site.

Taala Hooghan Infoshop is hosting it’s 4th Annual Liberate Earth Day!

We are inviting folks to propose workshops, discussions, films, etc. for this years event.

This year LED will be held on Sunday April 22 from 1-7pm at Taala Hooghan Infoshop. As always, this event is free to attend.

Please send workshop proposals by March 31st to infofosho@gmail.com. Space is very limited!

We’ll work to notify folks of participation as soon as we get proposals in.

ABOUT LED:

Earth Day has become an act of ritualized consumption by corporations and state agencies that greenwash their eco-cidal actions. LED is an educational and active anti-capitalist/anti-colonial event that addresses direct and meaningful ways towards healthy and sustainable communities.

In the past we’ve had skill-shares on sacred lands protection, direct action, permaculture,  discussions on eco-feminism, green scare and much more.

Join us for this educational and active event for an end to corporate greenwashing & “green” capitalism!

Some workshops and discussion at previous Liberate Earth Day events:

3rd Annual Workshops:

Anarchist Understandings of Nature and Social Change
Moon Time Liberation
An Affordable Way to Catch and Dispense Your Water
Green Consumerism: The Misguided Discourse on Sustainability
The Green Washing of the Prison Industrial Complex
Film Presentation: “Animal Exploitation, Heteropatriarchy and the Three
Pillars of White Supremacy.”
Underlying Contradictions in Liberation Struggles: A Discussion on Strategies Towards Meaningful Support and Solidarity

2nd Annual Workshops:

Abolish Profit Farming & the Importance of Autonomous Agriculture
Green Consumerism: The Misguided Discourse on Sustainability
Eco-Feminism
Derrick Jensen: The Problem of Civilization and Resistance (online video discussion)
Defending Sacred Lands – Intersections of environmental and social struggles for justice
Direct Action: Tactical training and discussion

1st Annual:

Abolishing the Non-profit Industrial Complex
Indigenous Traditionalism, Sustainability, & Civilization
Guerilla Gardening
Green Consumerism
Addressing the “Green Scare”

Taala Hooghan – Infoshop & Youth Media Arts Center
www.taalahooghan.org

Community Members, Activists Confront Suncor Energy at Oil Leak Site

***FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE***

March 10, 2012

Community Members & Activists Confront Suncor Energy at Oil Leak Site

Protestors demand an end to pollution in Colorado, Canada

Commerce City, Colo – Members of the Stop Suncor and Tar Sands Coalition, including the American Indian Movement of Colorado (AIM), Deep Green Resistance Colorado (DGR), United Community Action Network (UCAN), Occupy Denver, Front Range Rising Tide, 350.org, Boulder Food Rescue, and concerned citizens rallied and occupied the site of Suncor Energy’s oil leak on the shore of Sand Creek. Acting as Private Attorneys General, under the authority of the Clean Water Act, water samples were taken to be tested for contaminants. The demonstration sought to bring public attention to the fact that Suncor Energy’s continued negligence and environmental degradation is killing Colorado communities, water and wildlife, and to force the industrial polluter to confront the effects of its actions.

“Suncor has so poisoned this land, that oil is not spilling into these waters, it is bubbling up through the toxified soil from numerous burst sub-surface pipelines,” Deanna Meyer of Deep Green Resistance Colorado said. “ Benzene levels in this water—water that fish, ducks, geese, beavers, trees, grasses and many other beings depend on—are 100 times the safety standard, and what’s happening here is nothing compared to the destruction of the tar sands.”

Suncor’s role in the tar sands is contributing to a devastated climate and world, and is harming indigenous communities in Canada as well as people living in local communities in Colorado. The development of the tar sands—a form of oil deposit—in Athabasca has led to the deforestation of tens of thousands of square miles of the Boreal forest and the destruction of First Nations cultures. Suncor Energy declares itself to be the first corporation to begin the extraction of this abnormally dirty form of oil, and continues to do so today. Currently, Suncor produces more than 90,000 barrels of oil a day, much of this from tar sands oil, at its refinery in Commerce City, Colorado.

“All the oil that’s being spilled here came from Athabasca, which is a First Nation community. My people up there are suffering because of the oil we’re refining here,” said Tessa McLean of American Indian Movement of Colorado to the group of more than 150 that occupied the spill site. “We don’t want that oil here!”

While the spill was first reported on November 27th of last year, it is believed to have begun nine months earlier, when an underground pipe failed a pressure test, in February of 2011.  However, Suncor’s history of negligence and degradation goes far beyond 2011 (when 3 different leaks were reported). Underground “plumes” of leaked oil dot the refinery grounds, the wounds and scars left by the refinery’s operation. In addition, the refinery has been cited with nearly 100 distinct air-quality violations.

“Suncor’s activities are beyond toxic, they are incompatible with a living world and they must be stopped. A safe a just world has no place for oil leaks, toxic air, poisoned water, or the tar sands,” said the coalition.

On December 31st, the Stop Suncor and Tar Sands Coalition organized a march and rally to protest Suncor Energy on the 16th Street Mall in downtown Denver. After having now come to the site of the leak and become more familiar with the severity of the damage being wrought by Suncor, the group reiterated the need to confront and stop ecocide, whether that of Colorado waters and wildlife, or the Boreal forest of Athabasca.

As Tessa McLean said, “only when the last tree has been cut, only when the last fish has been caught, only when the last river has dried up, will we realize we cannot eat money.”


Protesters Rail Against Ongoing Clean-Up At Suncor

COMMERCE CITY, Colo. — Taking to the streets to protest the clean-up of Sand Creek, some 200 people made themselves heard in Commerce City Saturday.“So I want everybody to be aware of what’s happening in our backyard,” said Scott Denver Jacket, one of the protest organizers. Roughly 200 people lined I-270 around 4:00 p.m. Saturday, slowing traffic, drawing two Commerce City police cars. They carried signs reading “Lies”, “Got Benzene” and “Suncor Killed This River”.

Read more…

Also see: Suncor protest highlights – a set on Flickr

 

From the EF! Newswire:

This film is a pre-released version of the documentary “Earth First!: The Politics of Radical Environmentalism” produced by Chris Manes. Its an examination of Earth First! in the early days, filmed at, and around the time of, the 1987 Grand Canyon Round River Rendezvous–a definitive work of that era.  While Manes has not been present in the Earth First! movement for well over a decade, he was featured recently in the  ”Where Are They Now” section of the Earth First! Journal 30th Anniversary edition.

The documentary features live footage of tree spiking, monkey wrenching, early blockades and tree sits. And along with totally 80′s hair styles under camo hats and eco-militancy expressed in Sesame Street-sounding sing-alongs, it’s also chock-full of  powerful interviews: Earth First! co-founders Nancy Morton, Howie Wolke, Mike Roselle and Dave Foreman; former EF! Journal editor John Davis; prominent voice for deep ecology, author Bill Devall (who passed on last year); and voices from government agencies, the timber industry and mainstream groups like the Sierra Club.

This version of the film was posted on Youtube summer 2011 by longtime EF! activist and movement documentarian  Andy Caffrey.  Since this summer, Caffrey has added over 50 historical EF! videos online via his Youtube channel. He’s also running for Congress in 2012. And while we could more-or-less give a shit about who gets elected, we’re glad to see some of these videos back in circulatation amidst his campaign endeavors.

Buy DVDDownload Video (MP4)

END:CIV examines our culture’s addiction to systematic violence and environmental exploitation, and probes the resulting epidemic of poisoned landscapes and shell-shocked nations. Based in part on Endgame, the best-selling book by Derrick Jensen, END:CIV asks: “If your homeland was invaded by aliens who cut down the forests, poisoned the water and air, and contaminated the food supply, would you resist?”

The causes underlying the collapse of civilizations are usually traced to overuse of resources. As we write this, the world is reeling from economic chaos, peak oil, climate change, environmental degradation, and political turmoil. Every day, the headlines re-hash stories of scandal and betrayal of the public trust. We don’t have to make outraged demands for the end of the current global system — it seems to be coming apart already.

But acts of courage, compassion and altruism abound, even in the most damaged places. By documenting the resilience of the people hit hardest by war and repression, and the heroism of those coming forward to confront the crisis head-on, END:CIV illuminates a way out of this all-consuming madness and into a saner future.

Backed by Jensen’s narrative, the film calls on us to act as if we truly love this land. The film trips along at a brisk pace, using music, archival footage, motion graphics, animation, slapstick and satire to deconstruct the global economic system, even as it implodes around us. END:CIV illustrates first-person stories of sacrifice and heroism with intense, emotionally-charged images that match Jensen’s poetic and intuitive approach. Scenes shot in the back country provide interludes of breathtaking natural beauty alongside clearcut evidence of horrific but commonplace destruction.

END:CIV features interviews with Paul Watson, Waziyatawin,  Gord Hill, Michael Becker, Peter Gelderloos, Lierre Keith, James Howard Kunstler, Stephanie McMillan, Qwatsinas, Rod Coronado, John Zerzan and more.

“A fierce critique of systematic violence and industrial civilization, End:Civ is not intended for garden-variety environmentalists. If you are anywhere below, say, an 8 on that sliding scale of pissed off, then this film is going to scare you — which means you should watch it.”
-Eugene Weekly

A tour de force film from Franklin López which does more than justice to Derrick Jensen’s thesis that industrial civilization is destroying life on the planet.  Employing all the contemporary audio visual techniques our digital world makes possible for a single brilliant penurious filmmaker, López harvests sounds and images from our demented world to relentlessly show the rape of the mind and the earth.  To those outside the small choir who see the message of resistance as obvious, this powerful film makes them deal with it either by denial or acknowledging, yes I see it is obvious.”

James Becket
-Director of The Best Revenge

“Franklin Lopez is a fantastically talented filmmaker, who has created a powerful and important film about the most important topic ever: how to stop this culture from killing the planet.”
-Derrick Jensen, Author of Endgame

“By far the most routinely praised contemporary media activist is Franklin López. His shows and films not only possess a distinctive look and feel, but they also contain a wicked sense of humor that is often sorely lacking among alter-globalization activists. López’s work engages in constructing a new vision where popular culture serves the interests of the poor and dispossessed, where humor is reignited within activism, and the D.I.Y. ethics of punk and hip-hop allow those with talent and gumption to be the media, once again.”
-Chris Robé, Pop Matters

“Franklin Lopez’ END:CIV is a labour of love, a stunning 75 minutes film…”
John Zerzan, author of Future Primitive

“It brought me to tears…” “I recommend it to people”
-Alex Smith, Host of Radio Ecoshock

“Franklin Lopez’s END:CIV project is awesome.”
-Shannon Walsh, Director of H2Oil

“Both the quantity and the quality of this movement’s filmmaking is increasing. This is the big battlefield on which we fight right now.”
-Michael Rupert, CollapseNet.com

Franklin López will be touring with END:CIV in 2011.
The END:CIV DVD by PM Press can be ordered now.
If you wish to book a screening in your town or want to order a DVD, simply click on the links below.

Order DVDBook a community screeningBook a university screening

The Earth First! Journal Needs Your Support!

Posted: October 3, 2010 by EF! J Collective Everglades Office in media
Tags: ,

Greetings to all Defenders of the Wild!,

The Earth First! Journal Collective is currently in production on the 30th Anniversary Edition of the EF! Journal. We have an amazing collection of articles from movement writers, published authors and professors, as well as gorgeous art from a number of internationally renowned artists. Unfortunately, we are still short on funds, in order to reach our fundraising goal we have created two “Kickstarter” projects on the website: www.kickstarter.com to help raise needed funds for the printing costs of the anniversary issues, as well as fundraising for a new Earth First! music compilation.

The details about these projects are in the link below. It’s a quick, simple online fundraising effort. Small contributions can start to add up and encourage others to throw down on this worthy project! If possible, please consider throwing down a small donation. Equally important is your help in forwarding this info to people in your e-mail list (or social networking sites you frequent) that might be interested in helping us out.

The Kickstarter site automatically takes you to the Amazon payment check-out, of which you need an Amazon account for (weird) if you don’t have an Amazon account but want to donate you can make a donation through our: www.earthfirstjournal.org website on the home page. We will be moving donations to the Kickstarter account.

Thanks for any helping in fundraising and passing the word along!

Love & Solidarity!

For the Wild,

-the EF! J Collective

P.S. Remember that small donations add up… the minimum pledge is only $1!

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In the sacrifice zone

Posted: July 5, 2010 by earthfirstdurango in coal, fracking, media, oil & gas, shale oil, water
Tags: ,

Earth First! shakes up the Durango conservation scene

by Amy Donahue, The Durango Telegraph, 9/3/09

Well before Ed Abbey put the sands of Utah on the map, the Southwest has been a magnet for outdoor enthusiasts and wilderness aficionados willing to fight for the places they love. However, the very richness of the natural resources that bring these nature-lovers to the Four Corners also brings those interested in resource extraction. Thus, it often is a place of conflicting concerns and priorities.

“The Southwest is a designated national sacrifice area, and as the nation begins to look deeper for energy sources, we will be the focus of the onslaught in the coming decades,” said Nathan Coe, who recently co-founded a Durango chapter of Earth First! “We’re going to get hit harder and harder for things like oil and gas extraction, shale oil, uranium and infrastructure. These are all issues that mainstream groups have fought for years and have effectively stalled, but the projects are still moving forward.”

Coe and fellow Durangoan Travis Custer attended an Earth First! conference in Tucson in February. Along with attendees from Grand Junction and Denver, the two decided to revitalize an EF! presence in Colorado under the name High Country Earth First!. The Denver chapter already has begun campaigns against the expansion of I-70, but the chapter here is still in the developmental stages. Custer said that before a Durango chapter of EF! can establish itself, it is important to look at how the group may fit in with the already-strong activism here.

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